Sparklite

13 Feb 2012 449 views
 
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photoblog image Analog Clock

Analog Clock

About the photo:

Taken on a twin-lens reflex Lomo Lubitel 166+ medium format film camera, but using Lomo 400ISO 35mm film to expose the sprocket holes. I then rephotographed the negative with an Olympus E420 and the (brilliant) Olympus D.Zuiko 50mm f2 macro off an LED lit light table. 

 

About the subject:

One of my favourite subjects to photograph near home is the Summerhill lock tower. The Beaux Arts tower and adjoining train station (today a beautifully restored liquor store) served as Canadian Pacific’s main Toronto railway station for a short 14 years, between 1916 and 1930. When the depression hit it became unfeasible to keep the station operating and CP moved its services back to Union. 

 

The creamy-coloured and somewhat marbled textured Tyndall Limestone that was used in its construction can also be found it some other famous Canadian buildings, most notably the Canadian Museum of Civilization. It was the first Ontario building to use this stone, quarried just north of Winnipeg, Manitoba.  This limestone, the copper rooftop, and the beautiful clock faces provide a wonderful reminder of this community’s history – and, perhaps, a lost culture that believed in the value of beautiful architecture.

 

You can find an older (but digital!) photo of the tower here:

http://sparklite.shutterchance.com/photoblog/208184.htm

 

~iain.

Analog Clock

About the photo:

Taken on a twin-lens reflex Lomo Lubitel 166+ medium format film camera, but using Lomo 400ISO 35mm film to expose the sprocket holes. I then rephotographed the negative with an Olympus E420 and the (brilliant) Olympus D.Zuiko 50mm f2 macro off an LED lit light table. 

 

About the subject:

One of my favourite subjects to photograph near home is the Summerhill lock tower. The Beaux Arts tower and adjoining train station (today a beautifully restored liquor store) served as Canadian Pacific’s main Toronto railway station for a short 14 years, between 1916 and 1930. When the depression hit it became unfeasible to keep the station operating and CP moved its services back to Union. 

 

The creamy-coloured and somewhat marbled textured Tyndall Limestone that was used in its construction can also be found it some other famous Canadian buildings, most notably the Canadian Museum of Civilization. It was the first Ontario building to use this stone, quarried just north of Winnipeg, Manitoba.  This limestone, the copper rooftop, and the beautiful clock faces provide a wonderful reminder of this community’s history – and, perhaps, a lost culture that believed in the value of beautiful architecture.

 

You can find an older (but digital!) photo of the tower here:

http://sparklite.shutterchance.com/photoblog/208184.htm

 

~iain.

comments (1)

  • panda
  • Finland
  • 13 Feb 2012, 18:15
smile)))))))

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for this photo I'm in a constructive critical comments icon ShMood©
camera Lomo Lubitel 166+
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/125s
aperture f/8.0
sensitivity ISO400
focal length 75.0mm
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