Sparklite

06 Jul 2006 366 views
 
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photoblog image Ding-A-Ling

Ding-A-Ling

I captured this image while on a trip to the Centre Ville with some good friends of mine and their son. It's a whistle atop a small locomotive that takes kids on a long trip around the park. I like the image because of its colours -- the brass, red, and blue plus the more subtle greens of the trees beyond. I shot a few of these ranging from f/2.8 to f/8 but the DOF in this shot seemed the most appropriate. I hope you like it. As always your comments are most welcome!

Ding-A-Ling

I captured this image while on a trip to the Centre Ville with some good friends of mine and their son. It's a whistle atop a small locomotive that takes kids on a long trip around the park. I like the image because of its colours -- the brass, red, and blue plus the more subtle greens of the trees beyond. I shot a few of these ranging from f/2.8 to f/8 but the DOF in this shot seemed the most appropriate. I hope you like it. As always your comments are most welcome!

comments (7)

I agree with your assessment of the DOF as you wanted to feature the THREE elements of the train thereby sticking to "Sparklite's Rule of Threes". The background while not overpowering still has enough detail to give train context. I can tell that they are all here to worship the "Holy Trinity of the Kiddie Railway" grin
  • barbara
  • United States
  • 6 Jul 2006, 17:10
When do we get a public lecture on the Sparklite Trinity rule? Cmon share..or have I inadvertently missed it?
  • barbara
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 6 Jul 2006, 17:12
When do we get a public lecture on the Sparklite Trinity rule? Is this the new holy grail? or have I missed something?
  • barbara
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 6 Jul 2006, 17:18
I can see clearly now the rain has gone
I can see all obstacles in my way

so would this earn me brownie points?http://barbiek.shutterchance.com/photoblog/6114.htm
Chapter 117 of the "Expertly Expert Photographers Photography Handbook and General Reference Guide to All Things Photographically Inclined" (412th edition, revision 4, published May 2006) defines the "Sparklite Rule of Threes" as follows:

The 'Sparklite rule of threes' also known as the 'Sparklite trinity' is a photographic style based around groupings of three. These 'trinity' images, represent three items of some kind prominently in the image somewhere. The greatest representation of these is the famous 'Sparklite Trees' series of images, or more correctly the 'Sparklite Tree Trunk' series. This trinity can also be found in the renowned work of Matt Frederiksen, however this method was pioneered by the visionary photography master 'Sparklite' in the early 2000's and is appropriately named after him. The unmistakable distinct visual style this showcases of three draws the viewer into the image and captivates the imagination as well as stimulating the soul. Sparklite's work has received such comments as "why are there so many three's?" and "what's up with these damn tree trunks anyways?", as well as comments of renowned Photographer Stubby who has said "Lovely Shot, have to second me wifeys comments above" about sparklite's work. There has been a recent resurgence in the use of the 'Sparklite Rule of Three', and as such it has developed several distinct variations. There are numerous varietys to this style however some of the most prominent ones involve the 'hidden three' where by the triad is not clearly visible as objects, but may be either something that was in the area the photograph was taken and only the photographer could see, or most commonly it can be the division of the image into 3 distinct colour or tonal zones. For example in one of the more recent sparklite works "Ding-A-Ling" there is a distinct triad between the red smoke stack, the brass bell and the blue paint on the remainder of the train. This clearly illustrates the departure from 3 similar or solidly defined followings of the rule and shows a break into a more abstract interpretation.

The number Three has long held significance in many religions and cultural circles, which may attribute to it's use in modern photography, since photographers draw their inspiration from the world around them and the flood of triads in our world influences them, often subconsciously. A prime example of this is the triangle, the most basic of shapes, however it is everywhere, it permeates our society like the smell of a wet dog. Triangles or triads are everywhere, stop on the street one day and you will notice many things arranged in a triangle pattern, be it three people walking down the street, three newspaper boxes, three pieces of gum stuck to the sidewalk, there are triangles everywhere. The number three also has significance as being lucky in Asian culture. Harsh lines and sharp corners are unlucky, while smooth curves are viewed as good luck, this leaves 3 and 8 as the luckiest numbers to capture, however it is often far more difficult to capture 8 of something due to the permeation of the threes by both religious circles and secret organizations (the Illuminati use a pyramid as their logo, which has three corners when viewed in a photograph or illustration, as well as talking greatly about the 'third eye'wink. There is also the interpretation of the natural occurrences of the number three, which again is well documented in the 'Sparklite Three Trees' series of images. Lastly, the third eye, or the 'all seeing eye' that forms the triad within all humans, this is possibly one of the most debated influences and provides the strongest draw for us to capture Three.

-V V-
Iain Myrans: Wow. I'm impressed. That's a record comment. Probably the most detailed piece of writing on all of shutterchance. Visual Vault, your wonderful and humourous writing style brightens even the most dullest of days. I am left with a question however.... Do they not give you enough to do at work? wink

Thanks for the comment. I dare someone to post the 'Sparklite rule of threes' on Wikipedia wink
Iain Myrans: LOL! That's hilarious!
The start of a new religion maybe? Food for thought definitely. Lovely picture. The colours are top
Iain Myrans: Thanks Vincent smile

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for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera Olympus E-330
exposure mode aperture priority
shutterspeed 1/500s
aperture f/4.0
sensitivity ISO250
focal length 50.0mm
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